What Is
Medication-
Assisted
Recovery?

Medication-Assisted Recovery (MAR) is a type of treatment for OUD where medications and optional behavioral counseling are used to bring recovery within reach. The medications work to reduce your cravings and most help your withdrawal symptoms. MAR can help you move past your OUD and take back the power in your life.

If taken as prescribed, the medications used in MAR will work WITHOUT getting you high, so you can focus fully on moving forward.

What Is
Medication-
Assisted
Recovery?

Medication-Assisted Recovery (MAR) is a type of treatment for OUD where medications and optional behavioral counseling are used to bring recovery within reach. The medications work to reduce your cravings and most help your withdrawal symptoms. MAR can help you move past your OUD and take back the power in your life.

If taken as prescribed, the medications used in MAR will work WITHOUT getting you high, so you can focus fully on moving forward.

Why Start MAR?

MAR is the most effective way to treat opioid use disorder, and according to studies the success rate of MAR is up to 80% effectiveness.

Every medication works a bit differently, but depending on your treatment plan using MAR can have many personal benefits:

You can safely reduce cravings and
withdrawal symptoms

Lowering the chance of experiencing an
overdose can make you feel safer and
more secure

Improved birth outcomes among
women who have OUD can mean a less
stressful pregnancy

Treatment gives you greater control
over your life which can make you feel
more confidence

Being part of a treatment program leads
to lower health care costs compared to
trying to quit cold turkey

3 Types Of MAR

There are three FDA-approved medications most commonly used for treating OUD.

M

Methadone

Methadone is the most well-known medication for OUD and has been around the longest. Methadone must be taken daily as part of an opioid treatment program, and can only be dispensed by licensed healthcare professionals. Reporting to a clinic to get your daily dose gives you a stronger connection to support, as well as adding important structure to your recovery.

B

Buprenorphine

Buprenorphine, (Suboxone®, Subutex®, Probuphine®) can be started once you’ve been opioid-free for 12–24 hours. You can also get a prescription for home use, which gives you more independence than other treatment options. Once on it, you may only need to see your doctor weekly or monthly, however you must take buprenorphine regularly.

N

Naltrexone

Naltrexone is commonly given as a shot once a month to reduce cravings for both alcohol and opioids. You must have not used opioids for 7–10 days before starting on this type of medication. Naltrexone is effective at reducing cravings, but does not help with withdrawal. If you happen to return to opioid use, you are at higher risk for overdose.

How Does
MAR Work?

MAR medications act on the same receptors in your brain that opioids do, stopping your ability to feel the effects of opioids. This reduces cravings and depending upon which medication you take, it may also reduce withdrawal symptoms.

Once you no longer feel like cravings are taking over your life, it becomes easier to succeed at work, rebuild relationships with loved ones, or simply feel like yourself again.

Source

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Once you no longer feel like cravings are taking over your life, it becomes easier to succeed at work, rebuild relationships with loved ones, or simply feel like yourself again.

Source